The Heart of the Antarctic Being The Story Of The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909 By E.H. Shackleton, C.V.O. With an Introduction by Hugh Robert Mill, D.Sc. an Accoumt of the First Journey to the South Magnetic Pole By Professor T.W. Edgeworth David, F.R.S. E H. Shackleton.

The Heart of the Antarctic Being The Story Of The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909 By E.H. Shackleton, C.V.O. With an Introduction by Hugh Robert Mill, D.Sc. an Accoumt of the First Journey to the South Magnetic Pole By Professor T.W. Edgeworth David, F.R.S.

London: William Heinemann, 1909. Edition: First Edition, Binding: Original cloth boards with tooled lettering and picture rebacked expertly saving the original spine.. Gilt lettering and rules on the spine. Title in black and red., Notes: Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton, CVO, OBE (15 February 1874 – 5 January 1922) was an Anglo-Irish polar explorer,[1] one of the principal figures of the period known as the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. His first experience of the polar regions was as third officer on Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, from which he was sent home early on health grounds. Determined to make amends for this perceived personal failure, he returned to Antarctica in 1907 as leader of the Nimrod Expedition. In January 1909 he and three companions made a southern march which established a record Farthest South latitude at 88° 23′ S, 97 geographical miles (114statute miles, 190 km) from the South Pole, by far the closest convergence in exploration history up to that time. For this achievement, Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII on his return home.
After the race to the South Pole ended in 1912 with Roald Amundsen's conquest, Shackleton turned his attention to what he said was the one remaining great object of Antarctic journeying–the crossing of the continent from sea to sea, via the pole. To this end he made preparations for what became the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914–17. Disaster struck this expedition when its ship, Endurance, became trapped in pack ice and was slowly crushed before the shore parties could be landed. There followed a sequence of exploits, and an ultimate escape with no lives lost, that would eventually assure Shackleton's heroic status, although this was not immediately evident.[2] In 1921 he went back to the Antarctic with the Shackleton-Rowett Expedition, intending to carry out a programme of scientific and survey activities. Before the expedition could begin this work Shackleton died of a heart attack while his ship, Quest, was moored in South Georgia. At his wife's request he was buried there.
, Size: 4to, (182mm x 241mm), Illustration: Illustrated with a profusion of photographs, charts and 4 loose fold out maps., Volume: 2 Volumes, References: Spence, 1097, Pages: V1: P.Frontis, Half Title, copywrite info, dedication, preface (vii-xi), Intro (xiii-xxxviii), Contents (xxix-xl), List of Illustration (xli-xlviii), 1-371; V2: Half Title, Frontis, Title, Copywrite info, Contents (ii-viii), list of Illustrations (ix-xv), note, 1-399, Category: Book Arctic & Antarctic. In good condition. Edges are uncut. Item #B4085

Edition: First Edition, Binding: Original cloth boards with tooled lettering and picture rebacked expertly saving the original spine.. Gilt lettering and rules on the spine. Title in black and red., Notes: Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton, CVO, OBE (15 February 1874 – 5 January 1922) was an Anglo-Irish polar explorer,[1] one of the principal figures of the period known as the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. His first experience of the polar regions was as third officer on Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, from which he was sent home early on health grounds. Determined to make amends for this perceived personal failure, he returned to Antarctica in 1907 as leader of the Nimrod Expedition. In January 1909 he and three companions made a southern march which established a record Farthest South latitude at 88° 23′ S, 97 geographical miles (114statute miles, 190 km) from the South Pole, by far the closest convergence in exploration history up to that time. For this achievement, Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII on his return home.
After the race to the South Pole ended in 1912 with Roald Amundsen's conquest, Shackleton turned his attention to what he said was the one remaining great object of Antarctic journeying–the crossing of the continent from sea to sea, via the pole. To this end he made preparations for what became the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914–17. Disaster struck this expedition when its ship, Endurance, became trapped in pack ice and was slowly crushed before the shore parties could be landed. There followed a sequence of exploits, and an ultimate escape with no lives lost, that would eventually assure Shackleton's heroic status, although this was not immediately evident.[2] In 1921 he went back to the Antarctic with the Shackleton-Rowett Expedition, intending to carry out a programme of scientific and survey activities. Before the expedition could begin this work Shackleton died of a heart attack while his ship, Quest, was moored in South Georgia. At his wife's request he was buried there.
, Size: 4to, (182mm x 241mm), Illustration: Illustrated with a profusion of photographs, charts and 4 loose fold out maps., Volume: 2 Volumes, References: Spence, 1097, Pages: V1: P.Frontis, Half Title, copywrite info, dedication, preface (vii-xi), Intro (xiii-xxxviii), Contents (xxix-xl), List of Illustration (xli-xlviii), 1-371; V2: Half Title, Frontis, Title, Copywrite info, Contents (ii-viii), list of Illustrations (ix-xv), note, 1-399, Category: Book Arctic & Antarctic.

Price: $1,000.00

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